The Complications of Type 1 Diabetes

The other day, on another blog I write called Resparkable Vintage, I posted about my contribution for the upcoming JDRF Dream Gala Auction.  That website is really all about my repurposed vintage handmade designs, but in that particular post, since I mentioned the JDRF Gala, as well as the fact that I’m a Type 1, I gave a brief explanation about Type 1, thinking probably most of the readers over there don’t know much, if anything, about it.

Mainly, I just said Type 1 is an auto immune disease, and that our bodies don’tt produce insulin on their own, so therefore we have to inject synthetic insulin multiple times on a daily basis to survive.  I also mentioned that it’s a complicated disease.

And it is.  It’s hard to explain to someone what all of that means- Because what does insulin do exactly?  And that thing I mentioned about having to take synthetic insulin- how do you know how much to take? And when to take it? And what happens if you take the wrong amount?

Because, as anyone who lives with it knows, there’s no obvious or predictable formula for getting dosing amounts correct.  And the way a low blood sugar or a high blood sugar makes one feels varies from person to person, and from day to day.

Here’s a small, seemingly unimportant example of what it’s like to have Type 1 that I experienced today. I can never be spontanious about eating something.  If I’m at an event, as I was earlier today, and they happen to be serving lunch, I can’t just pop food into my mouth on a whim.  If I had wanted to eat at this luncheon, I would have needed to know what exactly I would be eating, at least 30 minutes before eating it, so that I could take what I hope is the right amount of insulin to cover it.  But since I didn’t know in advance, and they put a plate in front of me, I just said, “Oh no thanks, I already ate a late brunch.” It was a lie.  And truth be told, I was getting a little hungry.  But if I don’t take my insulin pretty well in advance of eating, my blood sugar will soar, and I will be on the diabetes roller coaster of high to low blood sugar for a good part of my day.  And it will likely make me feel like crap.

So, I keep it simple.  I say, “No thanks” to unplanned food.  I eat my same (some would say boring) lunch most days because it’s just easier.

I also happen to be a picky eater by nature, so most people who know me (including my husband) just sort of roll their eyes at me, assuming it’s all about my pickiness when I say no to food.  But I don’t even know which came first, my extreme pickiness, or just keeping my diet simple to avoid… well, COMPLICATIONS.

I don’t bother to explain these things.  It’s easier just to tell a little white lie.  “No thanks, my stomach’s a little upset.”  Or, like today, “No thanks.  I ate a late breakfast and didn’t realize there would be food here!”

Type 1.  It’s complicated.

One Touch Veria Meter

Every year or so, I have to switch my glucometer due to what my insurance will cover.  It’s not a huge deal, because meters are just meters- as long as they’re accurate.  I don’t care about the bells and whistles of meters that do special things with data anymore, because, well… I just don’t.  I have my Dexcom, and I feel like the bulk of important information comes from that anyway.  These days, my meter is just what I use to calibrate the Dexcom.  And as long as it’s calibrated, I trust the Dexcom’s numbers just as much or more than a glucometer.

My insurance company now only covers One Touch meters. So, it was time to move on again. My endo had two to chose from: the Verio and one other (I don’t recall the name) that looked a little flimsy, so I went with the Verio. I liked the sleek look of it.

One Touch Verio Glucometer

Instead of batteries, it has a charger.  Initially, I liked this idea.  But I just noticed last night that the charge only holds for 1-2 weeks.  So when I go on a trip that’s anything over a week, I have to remember to take yet another charging cord.  Ugh. So honestly, I think batteries are my preference.  They last for months, and double A batteries are cheap! Oh well.  Not a big deal.

Like pretty much all the meters I’ve tried in the past few years, the Verio is quick and simple.  Just a teeny bit of blood on the teeny strip, and 5 seconds later, you know what your blood sugar is.

I’m currently paying out of pocket until I meet my deductable, so this first 3 months supply of test strips cost me around $560 at my online pharmacy.  Just out of curiosity, my husband checked Amazon Prime’s pricing on the strips and they were actually CHEAPER on Amazon.  But we weren’t sure how regulated they were (when’s they’re expiration? why do the boxes look diffrent?) if I bought them through Amazon and the price difference wasn’t hugely significant. Before I order my next batch of strips, I might look into this a little more.  I guess I shouldn’t just assume that buying from my online pharmacy  (when it’s out of pocket and not a drug that needs a prescription) is always the best, most affordable option. I wonder how much the strips would be if I ordered them from Canada?