The New and Improved Clarity App for Dexcom

Back when I first got my Dexcom, two or three years ago, I downloaded the Clarity app on my phone and also looked at Clarity on my computer.  The phone app had very little to offer, but it did tell you an average of your readings over a 30, 60 and 90 period.  It also gave you a A1C predictor, based on your readings that equated with that average.  But that was about all it showed, that I recall.

If you went to Clarity via a computer though, you could view a lot more information.  There were various graphs that showed different things, like an overlay of your blood sugars over an entire month.  But I never became very familiar with it because it was on my computer rather than my phone, and I never spent the time looking at it. It just wasn’t all that convenient.

Eventually, the app did away with the predicted A1C number.  I’m not sure why.  But I can look on a chart and figure that out anyway as long as I know my blood sugar averages.  So really, who cares?  I didn’t and I still don’t.

This week, I had an appointment with my endocrinologist.  The nurse asked for the code generator for them from the Clarity phone app so they could view my Dexcom information.  It just happened to be, that out of boredom, while I was waiting for the doctor, I was playing around on my phone and noticed the app had all sorts of new bells and whistles since last time I had looked out it.  I use the term new loosely, because honestly, I have no idea when these new features were added.  I hadn’t looked at it in well over a year.

So, this may or may not be news to anyone but me that uses a Dexcom.

But if you haven’t looked lately at the Clarity phone app, it’s worth looking again.

You can now look at your average blood sugars for 48 hours, 7, 14, 30 or 90 days.  I like that!  Sometimes, it’s nice to just take things week by week- or less.

But wait, there’s more!

There are now 8 different reports to view.  If you click “reports” at the bottom of the screen, something similar to this pops up. Then, click in the middle box portion, just below 7/14/30/90 days, and above where it says “view report”.  You’ll then have a list of all 8 reports you can view:

  • overview
  • patterns
  • overlay
  • daily
  • compare
  • daily stats
  • hourly stats
  • AGP

You can then select one or all of those 8 reports by clicking on them.

Some of the reports are a little hard to look at due to screen size on phone, but you can zoom in.  When I looked at some of the graphs, for example the AGP (that stands for Ambulatory Glucose Profile- I looked it up!) I was able to see a repeating pattern I want to improve on.  Around 3-4pm most days, my blood sugar is usually at it’s highest.  I have some ideas on why that’s happening, and how I might improve upon it that I will try over the next few weeks.

I plan to learn a little more about how to read these various charts provided with the Clarity phone app.  Having the Dexcom has provided information that has helped me get me tighten my control since I began using it, and maybe these new features will motivate me to tighten it even more!  It hadn’t really dawned on me how almost every day around 3:30pm, my blood sugar is at it’s highest.  Now that I’m aware, I want to see what kind of an adjustments might make sense.

I’ve said it before, and fortunately, I get to say it again: I just had my best ever A1C with my most recent lab work.  Knowledge is power.  I know a lot more about how things effects my blood sugars, thanks to Dexcom.  I continue to tweak the way I do things regarding my blood sugar control.  Those tweaks are subtle, as they should be.  But little by little, things are getting BETTER.

The Small World of Type 1 Diabetes

Typically, when I get an unknown call on my cell phone, especially if it’s from out-of-state, I don’t pick it up.  But today, since I’m out of town, and have put out calls to some realtors that I desperately want a call back from, I picked up one of those “random” calls. And I guess, as they say, nothing is random or coincidental at all.

It was a person from GoDaddy just calling to make sure I was happy with the service they provide for this blog.  (I am.) As it turns out, the guy who called me, Jason, told me he is a T1 also!  He’s within a year of my age, and he also has had diabetes since his early 20s.

After he told me that, and I realized we had all that in common, I asked him if he also uses Dexcom’s CGM.  He doesn’t.  But he said he had been reading about it and thinking about it.  Anyone who has visited this blog before probably can tell, without diving in too deep- I’m a big fan of Dexcom and know that I have tighter control now than ever thanks in large part to the information it provides.

I let Jason know that, yep- so far so good with the GoDaddy hosting stuff… but way, way more importantly, I loved having an unexpected connection today with a fellow Type 1 person.

fullsizerender-7

A Good Night

My night time blood sugars don’t always look like this, but when they do, it means I’ve slept well.

IMG_1578
my Dexcom graph from last night. which i just might frame!

Last night, I was somehow able to go to sleep with my blood sugar right at around 100 and yet, it didn’t drop too low and demand a snack.  I would love to know the secret formula to recreate this every single night!

Just as a side note, you can see on my Dexcom graph how my bs popped up from around 70 mg/dL to 100 around 9am.  That was caused from just getting up and at ’em.  No food. Ok, actually 2 cashews, which is not that carb heavy.  I usually eat a couple of nuts because for some reason, I prefer to drink water after eating a couple of nuts. And I know it’s important to hydrate first thing in the morning after sleeping all night.  I have read that you snore and breathe out a lot of water while sleeping.  Sounds gross, but it’s just a human thing. Everyone does it.  I’m not drooling in some out-of-control way anymore than the next guy.

Although I do drink water first thing in the morning, I skip “breakfast”.  But I don’t think of it as skipping breakfast… I just delay when I break my fast until around lunchtime.  It’s also known as intermittent fasting. And it’s been working really well for me since I started doing it about 6 months ago. But I’ll save that blog post for next time!

Like I said, my over night blood sugar graph doesn’t always look like this.  But when it does, I have to show somebody. So thank you for indulging me!