My T1 Diabetes Blog. Reboot.

When I first began this blog about Type 1 Diabetes, although it had the same title, it was a Blogger blog.  I got a good amount of traffic in the beginning, and I felt like what I was writing was helping some people, and creating some great conversation among fellow Type 1 diabetics.  And that was my whole intention.

I thought switching to my own domain, and using the WordPress.org blog would give me better ownership of my content, and seem more legit.  But something got lost along the way during that transition.

boo hoo

I guess I just lost the momentum I had at the beginning. I started getting a lot of bogus comments from robots in the middle of the night. (Apparently, that’s a common problem for WordPress users) I got less feedback from real people than I did at my previous blog address.  I wasn’t sure how to promote my blog and get the readers that had found me the first time around to jump over to this new blog address with me.

I also started to feel like there were only so many posts I could write about insulin and glucometers and my beloved Dexcom. I felt like maybe I had said all I had to say on the topic of diabetes management.

I became frustrated and I decided this blog didn’t really matter to anyone anyway.

Actually, I’ve been re-thinking my pity party.

I’ve had diabetes for most of my adult life.  Something like 22 years.  And I think I have a pretty good handle on how to keep it under control, most of the time.  It’s a lot more complicated than just taking insulin and counting carbs to keep things in balance.  It’s recognizing patterns, it’s dealing with hormones, and emotions, and sleep, and workouts, and!, and!, and the list goes on. All of the things I do for my health- my physical, emotion, mental and even spiritual health- ALL OF IT, has at least some effect on my diabetes.

So I feel rejuvenated to begin again with this blog. I realize now that I can broaden the scope. I won’t just be writing about insulin and blood sugars.  I hope by posting regularly, I can find consistent readers who are also interested in choosing to live a happy and healthy lifestyle with an auto-immune disease like Type 1 Diabetes. Whether it’s in the comment section, or in sharing posts with friends, or in directly emailing me, I appreciate any and all conversation with you!

I’ll be posting on a regular weekly basis. Please subscribe so you won’t miss anything.  Thank you SO MUCH for visiting My Type 1 Diabetes Blog.

One Touch Veria Meter

Every year or so, I have to switch my glucometer due to what my insurance will cover.  It’s not a huge deal, because meters are just meters- as long as they’re accurate.  I don’t care about the bells and whistles of meters that do special things with data anymore, because, well… I just don’t.  I have my Dexcom, and I feel like the bulk of important information comes from that anyway.  These days, my meter is just what I use to calibrate the Dexcom.  And as long as it’s calibrated, I trust the Dexcom’s numbers just as much or more than a glucometer.

My insurance company now only covers One Touch meters. So, it was time to move on again. My endo had two to chose from: the Verio and one other (I don’t recall the name) that looked a little flimsy, so I went with the Verio. I liked the sleek look of it.

One Touch Verio Glucometer

Instead of batteries, it has a charger.  Initially, I liked this idea.  But I just noticed last night that the charge only holds for 1-2 weeks.  So when I go on a trip that’s anything over a week, I have to remember to take yet another charging cord.  Ugh. So honestly, I think batteries are my preference.  They last for months, and double A batteries are cheap! Oh well.  Not a big deal.

Like pretty much all the meters I’ve tried in the past few years, the Verio is quick and simple.  Just a teeny bit of blood on the teeny strip, and 5 seconds later, you know what your blood sugar is.

I’m currently paying out of pocket until I meet my deductable, so this first 3 months supply of test strips cost me around $560 at my online pharmacy.  Just out of curiosity, my husband checked Amazon Prime’s pricing on the strips and they were actually CHEAPER on Amazon.  But we weren’t sure how regulated they were (when’s they’re expiration? why do the boxes look diffrent?) if I bought them through Amazon and the price difference wasn’t hugely significant. Before I order my next batch of strips, I might look into this a little more.  I guess I shouldn’t just assume that buying from my online pharmacy  (when it’s out of pocket and not a drug that needs a prescription) is always the best, most affordable option. I wonder how much the strips would be if I ordered them from Canada?

 

 

Insulin Mistakes Happen

Back when I was using Lantus for my long acting insulin, I bought a Timesulin cap to help me remember not only IF I had taken my insulin each evening, but WHEN I took it.  It was helpful to me, because prior to that handy Timesulin cap, I would occasionally go into a panic around bedtime trying to remember, “Did I take my insulin, or did I just think about taking my insulin.”  There was no great way of knowing the answer other than waiting until the next day to see if I had a big spike in my blood sugar.

Anyway, this simple little Timesulin cap solved that problem. You just cap it on your insulin and the digital timer starts so you know when you took your last dose. Easy.

Until I switched over to using Tresiba for my long acting insulin.  I definitely prefer the way Tresiba worIMG_0426ks for me(it lasts longer, and doesn’t seem to have a peak at all- it’s very steady and predictable). However, the Timesulin cap doesn’t fit on the top of the Tresiba pen.  But, the way I’ve  solved the problem has been to keep that old Lantus pen in the drawer, beside my Tresiba.  I no longer use the Lantus insulin, but I take the Timesulin cap off and put it back on as I take my daily Tresiba shot.  Great.  So far, so good.

Until last night.

I was tired and I was multi tasking (which never works for me, no matter how simple the multi tasks are!), and as soon as I gave myself a the my shot, I said out loud, “Oh shit!”

I had given myself my usual dosage of long acting insulin… but I used the old (very old) Lantus instead of my Tresiba.  It wasn’t dated as expired, but I had stopped using it about 5 months ago.  All that time, it had just sat in a drawer in my bathroom- unrefridgerated.  So was it still working?  Even a little? I’ve always been told unrefridgerated insulin lasts only a month or so.

There was no way to really know how well this insulin could actually do it’s job, but it seemed a little too iffy and dangerous to just pile on more long acting insulin by taking a second shot, with my Tresiba pen.  Like I had said out loud to myself, Oh Shit.

But that night, and the next morning, everything seemed pretty typical, and my blood sugars were staying in the range where I like to keep them.

But by about 4pm that day my blood sugars started climbing.  I hadn’t eaten anything that would explain this late afternoon spike, so it seemed that whatever long acting insulin had been working earlier in the day, was finally leaving the building.  And it was running out of there pretty quickly all of the sudden.

I went ahead and took my Tresiba, far earlier in the day than I usually take it- Or a day late, depending on which way you look at it.  I also had to take some short acting insulin to get my blood sugar down near 100 (finally…it took some time, multiple shots, and patience).

Now, I’ve taken the needle off of the Lantus.  Duh.  Why didn’t I do that the first time around so that a mistake like this couldn’t happen?IMG_0427

But that’s the great thing about mistakes.  You learn from them.  And if you’re lucky, you won’t make the same mistake twice.

Managing Type 1 Diabetes is a constant learning process… I make all sorts of mistakes.  But I don’t let them bum me out.  I just learn from them, and try to do all that I can to do better next time.